GEAR 310 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Film Seminar: A Cinema in the Shade II
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEAR 310
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to introduce students to films that have an important place in film history and yet have low visibility in the framework of commercial cinema, and to enable the students to acquire film culture.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • describe the significant works of cinema in general
  • discuss the films they will see
  • classify films in cinema history
  • compare films in their relation to the structure of the cinematic institution that produced them
  • analyze these works in the context of their socio-cultural milieu
  • contrast cinematic traditions in terms of narrative, technique, authorial styles
Course Content This is the second of a series of courses, introducing and screening films crucial to forming film culture and not readily available elsewhere. The course includes canonic, experimental, avant-garde (commercial or non-commercial) examples of early cinema, American studio films, European art films, world cinema. There will be one midterm and one final exam.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Essay Film Screening Sans Soleil, Chris Marker (1983) David Montero “Film also ages: time and images in Chris Marker's Sans soleil”, Studies in French Cinema, 6:2, 2006, pp. 107-115.
3 French New New Wave / Cinéma du Look Screening Nikita, Luc Besson (1990) Sue Harris, “Cinema du Look,” European Cinema, ed. Elizabeth Ezra. Oxford University Press. 2004. pp.219-233.
4 LA Noir Screening Mulholland Drive, David Lynch (2001) Martha P. Nochimson “Mulholland Drive” Film Quarterly, Vol. 56 No. 1, Fall 2002; pp. 37-45.
5 New Iranian Cinema Screening Taste of Cherry, Abbas Kiarostami (1997) Hamid Naficy “Iranian Cinema” in The Oxford History of World Cinema, G. Nowell-Smith (Ed), Oxford University Press, 1996, pp. 672-678. David Sterritt “With Borrowed Eyes: An Interview with Abbas Kiarostami” Film Comment, vol.36, no.4. July/August 2000.
6 Women’s Cinema Screening Thelma and Louise, Ridley Scott (1991) Manohla Dargis “Roads to freedom” Sight and Sound; Jul 1, 1991; 1/3; pp. 15-18. Amy Taubin “Ridley Scott’s Roadwork” Sight and Sound; Jul 1, 1991; 1/3; pp. 18-19.
7 Postmodern Dystopia Screening Blade Runner, Ridley Scott (1982) Giuliana Bruno “Ramble City: Postmodernism and Blade Runner” October, Vol. 41 (Summer, 1987), pp. 61-74.
8 Midterm Exam
9 New Asian Cinema Screening In the Mood for Love, Wong Kar Wai (2000) Tony Rayns “Poet of Time” Sight and Sound; Sep 1, 1995; 5/9; pp. 12-16. Stephen Teo “Wong Kar-wai's In the Mood for Love: Like a Ritual in Transfigured Time” Senses of Cinema. March-April 2001.
10 Cinema and Sexuality Screening The Love Witch, Anna Biller (2017) Christopher Heron “A Woman Constructing Her World: Anna Biller Interview (The Love Witch)” The Seventh Art Online. Apr 05, 2017. http://theseventhart.org/anna-biller-interview-the-love-witch/
11 Northern European Farce Screening The Match Factory Girl, Aki Kaurismaki (1990) Bert Cardullo “Finnish Character: An Interview with Aki Kaurismäki” Film Quarterly, Vol. 59, No. 4 (Summer 2006), pp. 4-10. Sanna Kivimaki, “Working-class girls in a welfare state: Finnishness, social class and gender in Aki Kaurismäki's Workers' Trilogy (1986-1990)” Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, Volume 2, Number 1, 31 January 2012, pp. 73-88.
12 Cinema of the banlieus Screening Le Haine, Mathieu Kassovitz (1995) Amy Siciliano, “La Haine: Framing the ‘Urban Outcasts’” ACME International Journal for Critical Geographies, Vol. 6 No. 2. 2007, pp.211-230.
13 European Cinema Screening Caché, Michael Haneke (2005) Nancy E. Virtue “Memory, Trauma, and the French-Algerian War: Michael Haneke's Caché (2005)” Modern & Contemporary France, 19:3. 2011, pp. 281-296.
14 Final Exam
15 Review of the semester
16 Review of the semester

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

Geoffrey Nowell-Smith. The Oxford History of World Cinema. Oxford University Press, 1999.

 

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
50
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
25
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
15
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
120

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1 Adequate knowledge in Mathematics, Science and Software Engineering; ability to use theoretical and applied information in these areas to model and solve Software Engineering problems
2 Ability to identify, define, formulate, and solve complex Software Engineering problems; ability to select and apply proper analysis and modeling methods for this purpose
3 Ability to design, implement, verify, validate, measure and maintain a complex software system, process or product under realistic constraints and conditions, in such a way as to meet the desired result; ability to apply modern methods for this purpose
4 Ability to devise, select, and use modern techniques and tools needed for Software Engineering practice
5 Ability to design and conduct experiments, gather data, analyze and interpret results for investigating Software Engineering problems
6 Ability to work efficiently in Software Engineering disciplinary and multi-disciplinary teams; ability to work individually
7 Ability to communicate effectively in Turkish, both orally and in writing; knowledge of a minimum of two foreign languages
8 Recognition of the need for lifelong learning; ability to access information, to follow developments in science and technology, and to continue to educate him/herself
9 Awareness of professional and ethical responsibility
10 Information about business life practices such as project management, risk management, and change management; awareness of entrepreneurship, innovation, and sustainable development
11 Knowledge about contemporary issues and the global and societal effects of engineering practices on health, environment, and safety; awareness of the legal consequences of Software Engineering solutions

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest