GEAR 306 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Hollywood Cinema
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEAR 306
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to enable students to develop a general knowledge of Hollywood's production/distribution/exhibition networks. It identifies main themes and styles throughout Hollywood's history and discusses its patterns of authorship, star system, technology and genres. The course contextualizes Hollywood as a global system not only as a business but also as a system of meanings.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts in film studies and their reflections on Hollywood cinema
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the heterogeneity of Hollywood cinema with its various genres and approaches.
  • Understand of Hollywood’s star system, key studios, directors and its relation to other media.
  • Understand Hollywood’s complex relationship to key social and economic crises, cultural shifts and technological developments.
  • Critically analyze individual Hollywood films from different periods and genres, while also comparing different films from a diversity of genres and periods.
Course Content This course examines Hollywood in its economic, cultural and historical context. It studies its industrial dynamics (studio system, star system, etc.) in parallel with its narrative tendencies and stylistic devices. Students are expected to attend the lectures, watch the films and actively participate with the class discussion following each screening.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction - Hollywood and Social Change Modern Times (1936) Charlie Chaplin Howe, Lawrence. "Charlie Chaplin in the age of Mechanical Reproduction: reflexive ambiguity in Modern Times." College Literature 40, no. 1 (2013): 45-65.
2 Hollywood Adaptations and Cross-Cultural Exchanges All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) Lewis Milestone Chambers, John Whiteclay. "‘All Quiet on the Western Front’(1930): the antiwar film and the image of the first world war." Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television 14, no. 4 (1994): 377-411.
3 Intertextuality Casablanca (1942) Michael Curtiz Eco, Umberto. "" Casablanca": Cult Movies and Intertextual Collage." SubStance 14, no. 2 (1985): 3-12.
4 Cinematic Ambiguity and Multiple Meanings Citizen Kane (1941) Orson Welles Mulvey, Laura. Citizen Kane. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2017, p.17 -37
5 Reflections on the Medium of Cinema Rear Window (1954) Alfred Hitchcock Howe, Lawrence. "Through the Looking Glass: Reflexivity, Reciprocality, and Defenestration in Hitchcock's" Rear Window"." College Literature (2008): 16-37.
6 Hollywood Art Blow-Up (1966) Michelangelo Antonioni Harris, Thomas. "Rear Window and Blow-Up: Hitchcock's Straightforwardness vs. Antonioni's Ambiguity." Literature/Film Quarterly 15, no. 1 (1987): 60-63.
7 New Hollywood Era American Graffiti (1973) George Lucas Curtis, James M. "From American Graffiti to Star Wars." The Journal of Popular Culture 13, no. 4 (1980): 590-601.
8 New Hollywood and Auteur Cinema Apocalypse Now (1979) Francis Ford Coppola Kael, Pauline. “Circles and Squares.” Film Quarterly, Vol. 16, No. 3 (Spring, 1963), pp. 12-26., & Lewis, Jon “Major Films and Filmmakers of the Auteur Renaissance,” American Film: A History. pp. 291-319
9 Sci-Fi Neo Noir Blade Runner (1982) Ridley Scott Barad, J., Blade Runner and Sartre, The Philosophy of Neo-Noir, 2007 The University Press of Kentucky.
10 Independent Black Cinema Do The Right Thing (1989) Spike Lee Lott, Tommy L., “A No-Theory Theory of Contemporary Black Cinema.” Black American Literature Forum, Vol. 25, No. 2, Black Film Issue (Summer, 1991), pp. 221-
11 The American Dream and the End of the Frontier The Big Lebowski (1998) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen Tangney, ShaunAnne. “The Dream Abides: The Big Lebowski," Film Noir, and the American Dream.” Rocky Mountain Review, Vol. 66, No. 2 (Fall 2012), pp. 176-193
12 Social Critique and Violence Fight Club (1999) David Fincher Henry A. Giroux, “Brutalized Bodies and Emasculated Politics: Fight Club, Consumerism and Masculine Violence,” Breaking in to the Movies: Film and Culture of Politics (Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell, 2002), 258-287.
13 History and Politics in the Horror Genre Get Out (2017) Jordan Peele Landsberg, Alison, “Horror Vérité: Politics and History in Jordan Peele’s Get Out.” Continuum, 32:5, (2018) 629-642.
14 Teen Noir Thoroughbreds, (2017) Cory Finley Chang, J.,Cory Finley's 'Thoroughbreds' is a Delectably Twisted Mean-Girls Noir, The Los Angeles Times, March 8, 2018.
15 Course Review
16 Final Exam

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

Bordwell, David, and Kristin Thompson. Film History: An Introduction. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2008

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
40
Final / Oral Exam
1
50
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
3
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
25
Final / Oral Exam
1
29
    Total
102

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1 Adequate knowledge in Mathematics, Science and Software Engineering; ability to use theoretical and applied information in these areas to model and solve Software Engineering problems
2 Ability to identify, define, formulate, and solve complex Software Engineering problems; ability to select and apply proper analysis and modeling methods for this purpose
3 Ability to design, implement, verify, validate, measure and maintain a complex software system, process or product under realistic constraints and conditions, in such a way as to meet the desired result; ability to apply modern methods for this purpose
4 Ability to devise, select, and use modern techniques and tools needed for Software Engineering practice
5 Ability to design and conduct experiments, gather data, analyze and interpret results for investigating Software Engineering problems
6 Ability to work efficiently in Software Engineering disciplinary and multi-disciplinary teams; ability to work individually
7 Ability to communicate effectively in Turkish, both orally and in writing; knowledge of a minimum of two foreign languages
8 Recognition of the need for lifelong learning; ability to access information, to follow developments in science and technology, and to continue to educate him/herself
9 Awareness of professional and ethical responsibility
10 Information about business life practices such as project management, risk management, and change management; awareness of entrepreneurship, innovation, and sustainable development
11 Knowledge about contemporary issues and the global and societal effects of engineering practices on health, environment, and safety; awareness of the legal consequences of Software Engineering solutions

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest