Syllabus | İzmir University of Economics

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING

Department of Software Engineering

GEAR 306 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Hollywood Cinema
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEAR 306
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to enable students to develop a general knowledge of Hollywood's production/distribution/exhibition networks. It identifies main themes and styles throughout Hollywood's history and discusses its patterns of authorship, star system, technology and genres. The course contextualizes Hollywood as a global system not only as a business but also as a system of meanings.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts in film studies and their reflections on Hollywood cinema
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the heterogeneity of Hollywood cinema with its various genres and approaches.
  • Understand of Hollywood’s star system, key studios, directors and its relation to other media.
  • Understand Hollywood’s complex relationship to key social and economic crises, cultural shifts and technological developments.
  • Critically analyze individual Hollywood films from different periods and genres, while also comparing different films from a diversity of genres and periods.
Course Description This course examines Hollywood in its economic, cultural and historical context. It studies its industrial dynamics (studio system, star system, etc.) in parallel with its narrative tendencies and stylistic devices. Students are expected to attend the lectures, watch the films and actively participate with the class discussion following each screening.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Hollywood and Social Change Modern Times (1936) Charlie Chaplin Howe, Lawrence. "Charlie Chaplin in the age of Mechanical Reproduction: reflexive ambiguity in Modern Times." College Literature 40, no. 1 (2013): 45-65.
2 Intertextuality in Cinema Casablanca (1942) Michael Curtiz Eco, Umberto. "" Casablanca": Cult Movies and Intertextual Collage." SubStance 14, no. 2 (1985): 3-12.
3 Melodrama as the Foundational Basis of Hollywood All About Eve (1950) Joseph L. Mankiewicz Lloyd, J., & Johnson, L. (2003). The three faces of Eve: The post-war housewife, melodrama, and home 1. Feminist Media Studies, 3(1), 7-25.
4 Gaze Theory Rear Window (1954) Alfred Hitchcock Howe, Lawrence. "Through the Looking Glass: Reflexivity, Reciprocality, and Defenestration in Hitchcock's" Rear Window"." College Literature (2008): 16-37.
5 Hollywood Art and Auteur Theory Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) Stanley Kubrick Maland, C. (1979). Dr. Strangelove (1964): Nightmare comedy and the ideology of liberal consensus. American quarterly, 31(5), 697-717.
6 New Hollywood Era Bonnie and Clyde (1967) Arthur Penn King, G. (2002). New Hollywood Cinema: An Introduction. Bloomsbury Publishing, pp. 1-39
7 The Rise of Blockbusters Star Wars (1977) George Lucas Gordon, A. (1978). Star Wars: A myth for our time. Literature/Film Quarterly, 6(4), 314.
8 Images of Women in Film One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest (1975) Milos Forman Farber, S., Americana, Sweet and Sour, The Hudson Review, Vol. 29, No. 1 (Spring, 1976), pp. 95-102
9 Independent Cinema Sex, Lies and Videotape (1989) Stephen Soderberg Perren, Alisa. “Sex, Lies and Marketing: Miramax and the Development of the Quality Indie Blockbuster.” Film Quarterly, Vol. 55, No. 2 (Winter 2001), pp. 30-39
10 Re-masculinizing the American Male American Beauty (1999) Sam Mendes Karlyn, Kathleen. "Too Close for Comfort: American Beauty" and the Incest Motif.” Cinema Journal, Vol. 44, No. 1 (Autumn, 2004), pp. 69-93
11 The Western No Country for Old Men (2007) Joel and Ethan Coen Mitchell, Lee Clark. “Dismantling the Western: Film Noir's Defiance of Genre in No Country for Old Men.” Genre (2014) 47 (3) pp. 335–356.
12 The Period Film Jane Eyre (2011) Cary Joji Fukunaga Williams, Carolyn. “Review Jane Eyre”. Victorian Literature and Culture. Vol. 40, No. 1 (2012), pp. 331-337
13 History and Politics in the Horror Genre Get Out (2017) Jordan Peele Landsberg, Alison, “Horror Vérité: Politics and History in Jordan Peele’s Get Out.” Continuum, 32:5, (2018), pp. 629-642.
14 Teen Noir Thoroughbreds, (2017) Cory Finley Chang, J.,Cory Finley's 'Thoroughbreds' is a Delectably Twisted Mean-Girls Noir.” The Los Angeles Times, March 8, 2018.
15 Course Review
16 Final Exam

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

Bordwell, David, and Kristin Thompson. Film History: An Introduction. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2008

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
40
Final Exam
1
40
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
3
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
0
Study Hours Out of Class
0
Field Work
0
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
0
Homework / Assignments
1
15
15
Presentation / Jury
0
Project
0
Seminar / Workshop
0
Oral Exam
0
Midterms
1
25
25
Final Exam
1
29
29
    Total
117

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To have adequate knowledge in Mathematics, Science, Computer Science and Software Engineering; to be able to use theoretical and applied information in these areas on complex engineering problems.

2

To be able to identify, define, formulate, and solve complex Software Engineering problems; to be able to select and apply proper analysis and modeling methods for this purpose.

3

To be able to design, implement, verify, validate, document, measure and maintain a complex software system, process, or product under realistic constraints and conditions, in such a way as to meet the requirements; ability to apply modern methods for this purpose.

4

To be able to devise, select, and use modern techniques and tools needed for analysis and solution of complex problems in software engineering applications; to be able to use information technologies effectively.

5

To be able to design and conduct experiments, gather data, analyze and interpret results for investigating complex Software Engineering problems.

6

To be able to work effectively in Software Engineering disciplinary and multi-disciplinary teams; to be able to work individually.

7

To be able to communicate effectively in Turkish, both orally and in writing; to be able to author and comprehend written reports, to be able to prepare design and implementation reports, to be able to present effectively, to be able to give and receive clear and comprehensible instructions.

8

To have knowledge about global and social impact of engineering practices and software applications on health, environment, and safety; to have knowledge about contemporary issues as they pertain to engineering; to be aware of the legal ramifications of Engineering and Software Engineering solutions.

9

To be aware of ethical behavior, professional and ethical responsibility; to have knowledge about standards utilized in engineering applications.

10

To have knowledge about industrial practices such as project management, risk management, and change management; to have awareness of entrepreneurship and innovation; to have knowledge about sustainable development.

11

To be able to collect data in the area of Software Engineering, and to be able to communicate with colleagues in a foreign language. ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1)

12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To recognize the need for lifelong learning; to be able to access information, to be able to stay current with developments in science and technology; to be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to Software Engineering.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest

 


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