GEAR 307 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Contemporary World Cinema
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEAR 307
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This class will examine feature-length movies from various regions of the world with a specific focus on questions of realism and art in contemporary cinema. Different genres of film will be closely analyzed to introduce students to contemporary movements in cinema. We will also closely scrutinize in this course the ways in which contemporary global cinema closely parallels and responds to the cultural, social and political challenges of the 21st century globalized world.
Course Description The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Identify the major movements in contemporary global cinema
  • Learn about contemporary discussions on cinematic art and realism
  • Evaluate the characteristics of feature-length films produced in different regions of the world
  • Discover the close links between global cinema and cultural changes that occur in a globalized world.
  • Learn about the interactions between the global influences and the local histories in the production of contemporary cinema
  • Learn about the changing characteristics of film genres
  • Discover the ways how different genres of films often play specific socio-cultural and political roles in distinct geographies.
Course Content Each week in this class, we will watch and examine a feature-length film produced in 2000’s, in a particular region of the world but achieved global appeal. Corresponding readings of the week will both explain and deepen the understanding of the film’s thematic and technical structure, while emphasizing its cultural significance for the present-day audiences.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to Art and Realism in Cinema Billy Elliot (2000) Alderson, David. "Making Electricity: Narrating Gender, Sexuality, and the Neoliberal Transition in Billy Elliot." Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies 25, no. 3 (75) (2011): 1-27.
2 Hyperlink Realism of Intertwining Stories A Touch of Sin (2013) Wang, Yanjie. "Violence, wuxia, migrants: Jia Zhangke's cinematic discontent in A Touch of Sin." Journal of Chinese Cinemas 9, no. 2 (2015): 159-172.
3 Noir Comedy and Social Realism Volver (2006) Golob, Stephanie R. "Volver: the return of/to transitional justice politics in Spain." Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies9, no. 2 (2008): 127-141.
4 Magic Realism Pan’s Labyrinth (2006) Orme, Jennifer. "Narrative Desire and Disobedience in" Pan's Labyrinth"." Marvels & Tales (2010): 219-234.
5 Historical Film and Questions of Historical Authenticity The Eternal Zero (2013) Landsberg, Alison. "Prosthetic memory: the ethics and politics of memory in an age of mass culture." In Memory and popular film. Manchester University Press, 2018, pp. 144-159.
6 Heritage Film and Nostalgia An Education (2009) Higson, Andrew. "Nostalgia is not what it used to be: heritage films, nostalgia websites and contemporary consumers." Consumption Markets & Culture 17, no. 2 (2014): 120-142.
7 Art Film and Visual Aesthetics Iklimler (Climates) (2006) Bordwell, David. "The art cinema as a mode of film practice." Film Criticism 4, no. 1 (1979): 56-64.
8 Experimental Film Meets Drama The Tree of Life (2011) French, Sarah, and Zoë Shacklock. "The affective sublime in Lars von Trier's Melancholia and Terrence Malick's The Tree of Life." New Review of Film and Television Studies 12, no. 4 (2014): 339-356.
9 Art and Politics A Separation (2011) Chaudhuri, Shohini, and Howard Finn. "The open image: poetic realism and the New Iranian Cinema." Screen 44, no. 1 (2003): 38-57.
10 Cross-cultural Dialogues Certified Copy (2010) Higbee, Will, and Song Hwee Lim. "Concepts of transnational cinema: Towards a critical transnationalism in film studies." Intellect 1, no. 1 (2010): 7-21
11 Art and Realism in New Age Documentaries Stories We Tell (2012) Sarah Polley's Documemoir Stories We Tell: The Refracted Subject Biography (2015): 543-555.
12 Science-Fiction and Contemporary Social Issues Snowpiercer (2013) Canavan, Gerry. "“If the Engine Ever Stops, We’d All Die”: Snowpiercer and Necrofuturism." Paradoxa (2014), p. 1-27.
13 Independent Movies – ‘Sideways’ to Blockbusters Sideways (2004) Nystrom, Derek. "Fear of Falling Sideways: Alexander Payne's Rhetoric of Class." Postmodern Culture 16, no. 1 (2005).
14 Contemporary Animation and Its Global Appeal “The Tale of the Princess Kaguya (2013)” Cooper-Chen, Anne. "Cartoon planet: the cross-cultural acceptance of Japanese animation." Asian Journal of Communication 22, no. 1 (2012): 44-57.
15 Review of the semester
16 Final Exam

 

Course Notes/Textbooks

The course uses the sources that are listed above in the weekly subjects and related preparations.

Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
4
40
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
1
40
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
5
60
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
4
4
Homework / Assignments
20
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
1
20
    Total
116

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1 Adequate knowledge in Mathematics, Science and Software Engineering; ability to use theoretical and applied information in these areas to model and solve Software Engineering problems
2 Ability to identify, define, formulate, and solve complex Software Engineering problems; ability to select and apply proper analysis and modeling methods for this purpose
3 Ability to design, implement, verify, validate, measure and maintain a complex software system, process or product under realistic constraints and conditions, in such a way as to meet the desired result; ability to apply modern methods for this purpose
4 Ability to devise, select, and use modern techniques and tools needed for Software Engineering practice
5 Ability to design and conduct experiments, gather data, analyze and interpret results for investigating Software Engineering problems
6 Ability to work efficiently in Software Engineering disciplinary and multi-disciplinary teams; ability to work individually
7 Ability to communicate effectively in Turkish, both orally and in writing; knowledge of a minimum of two foreign languages
8 Recognition of the need for lifelong learning; ability to access information, to follow developments in science and technology, and to continue to educate him/herself
9 Awareness of professional and ethical responsibility
10 Information about business life practices such as project management, risk management, and change management; awareness of entrepreneurship, innovation, and sustainable development
11 Knowledge about contemporary issues and the global and societal effects of engineering practices on health, environment, and safety; awareness of the legal consequences of Software Engineering solutions

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest