Syllabus | İzmir University of Economics

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING

Department of Software Engineering

GEAR 307 | Course Introduction and Application Information

Course Name
Contemporary World Cinema
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
GEAR 307
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4

Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to introduce students to contemporary world cinema. It consists of film history, key concepts in film studies and world cinema research, and questions of representation in relation to issues of gender, sexuality, race and ethnicity in a global context.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Define main themes, key moments and trends in contemporary world cinema from the 1980s onwards.
  • Discuss how world cinema intervenes in debates about, and contributes new understandings to, our formulation of the local, national and the transnational in contemporary film studies.
  • Compare discourses regarding questions of representation in the context of gender, race, class and sexuality in cinema across different geographies.
  • Analyze key concepts in film studies and how they apply to world cinema.
  • Discuss meanings of the concepts of local, national and global in their wider implications to film and media studies as well as other disciplines of humanities.
  • Analyze diverse beliefs, practices, stories, and conditions within a wide range of Western and non-Western Cultures through the representations in the films.
  • Discuss film’s power to reflect, reveal, critique, and challenge cultural systems and globalization.
  • Evaluate complex relationships between national identity and transnational production.
Course Description This course combines viewing of films followed by class discussion. Each week, we will summarize key points and arguments made by a film scholar on a particular topic and watch a film that relates closely to the text.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Management Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Middle Eastern Cinema: Iran A Separation (2011) Asghar Farhadi Moore, L. C. (2005) “Women in a Widening Frame: (Cross-) Cultural Projection, Spectatorship and Iranian Cinema” Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture and Media Studies, 20(2), pp. 1-33.
3 Eastern European Cinema: Hungary White God (2014) Kornél Mundruczó Nelson, Max. (2015). “White God” Review. Film Comment, Vol. 51, No. 2 (Mar/April), pp. 68-69.
4 Western European Cinema I: Spain Talk to Her (2002) Pedro Almodóvar Yanof, Judith, (2008) “Habla Con Ella Through the Lens of Gender” Psychoanalytic Quarterly, LXXVII, pp. 609 – 626.
5 Western European Cinema II: England Sexy Beast (2000) Jonathan Glazer Sweeney, Kevin W. (2003) “Inner Monsters in Sexy Beast”, The Journal of American Culture, Vol. 26, No. 1, pp. 63 – 70.
6 Subcontinent Cinema: India Monsoon Wedding (2001) Mira Nair Larkin, B. (1997) “Indian films and Nigerian Lovers: Media and the Creation of Parallel Modernities” Africa, 67(03), pp. 406-440.
7 The Global South I: Uganda Call Me Kuchu (2012) Katherine Fairfax Wright, Malika Zouhali-Worrall Adesokan, A. (2012). “Nollywood and the Idea of the Nigerian Cinema” Journal of African Cinemas, 4(1), pp. 81-98.
8 The Global South II: Mauritania Timbuktu (2014) Abderrahmane Sissako Pasley, Victoria. (2014). “Beyond Violence in Abderrahmane Sissako’s Timbuktu” African Studies Review, 59(3), pp. 294-301.
9 Cinema in Australia and New Zealand: The Piano (1993) Jane Campion Klinger, Barbara. (2006). “The Art Film, Affect and the Female Viewer: The Piano Revisited”. Screen 47:1, pp. 19-41.
10 Korean New Wave: Snowpiercer (2013) Bong Joon-Ho Schulze, Jonathan (2019) “The Sacred Engine and the Rice Paddy: Globalization, Genre, and Local Space in the Films of Bong Joon-ho” Journal of Popular Film and Television, 47:1, 21-29, pp. 21-29.
11 Japanese Cinema: Shoplifters (2018) Hirokazu Kore-eda Erlich, Linda C., (2011). “Kore-eda’s Ocean View” Film Criticism, Vol. 35, No. 2/3, pp.127–146.
12 Latin America: Argentina Wild Tales (2014) Damian Szifron Rocha, C. (2009) “Contemporary Argentine Cinema during Neoliberalism” Hispania, vol. 92 No. 4 (December) pp. 841-851.
13 Latin America: Brazil City of God (2002) Fernando Meirelles,and Katia Lund McClennen, Sophia A., (2011) “From the Aesthetics of Hunger to the Cosmetics of Hunger in Brazilian Cinema: Meirelles' City of God” Symplokē , Vol. 19, No. 1-2, pp. 95-106
14 Course Review
15 Course Review
16 Final Exam

 

Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exams
Midterm
1
45
Final Exam
1
45
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
2
55
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
45
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Theoretical Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
0
Study Hours Out of Class
0
Field Work
0
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
0
Homework / Assignments
0
Presentation / Jury
0
Project
0
Seminar / Workshop
0
Oral Exam
0
Midterms
1
30
30
Final Exam
1
30
30
    Total
108

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To have adequate knowledge in Mathematics, Science, Computer Science and Software Engineering; to be able to use theoretical and applied information in these areas on complex engineering problems.

2

To be able to identify, define, formulate, and solve complex Software Engineering problems; to be able to select and apply proper analysis and modeling methods for this purpose.

3

To be able to design, implement, verify, validate, document, measure and maintain a complex software system, process, or product under realistic constraints and conditions, in such a way as to meet the requirements; ability to apply modern methods for this purpose.

4

To be able to devise, select, and use modern techniques and tools needed for analysis and solution of complex problems in software engineering applications; to be able to use information technologies effectively.

5

To be able to design and conduct experiments, gather data, analyze and interpret results for investigating complex Software Engineering problems.

6

To be able to work effectively in Software Engineering disciplinary and multi-disciplinary teams; to be able to work individually.

7

To be able to communicate effectively in Turkish, both orally and in writing; to be able to author and comprehend written reports, to be able to prepare design and implementation reports, to be able to present effectively, to be able to give and receive clear and comprehensible instructions.

8

To have knowledge about global and social impact of engineering practices and software applications on health, environment, and safety; to have knowledge about contemporary issues as they pertain to engineering; to be aware of the legal ramifications of Engineering and Software Engineering solutions.

9

To be aware of ethical behavior, professional and ethical responsibility; to have knowledge about standards utilized in engineering applications.

10

To have knowledge about industrial practices such as project management, risk management, and change management; to have awareness of entrepreneurship and innovation; to have knowledge about sustainable development.

11

To be able to collect data in the area of Software Engineering, and to be able to communicate with colleagues in a foreign language. ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1)

12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently.

13

To recognize the need for lifelong learning; to be able to access information, to be able to stay current with developments in science and technology; to be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to Software Engineering.

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest

 


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